Applications Videos

Historic Properties

Properties For Sale

About the Commission

Browse By Topic

Local History

Links

Home

The Eastover School is a one-story brick school building located at 500 Cherokee Road in Charlotte.  The building faces east and is setback approximately seventy-five feet from the road.  The school was built in a residential neighborhood and is surrounded by single-family homes.  The mass of the building runs parallel to the street, and presents a wide facade, approximately 350'.   The original portion of the school was built in 1935, and was greatly expanded in 1941.

Southern portion of the facade includes the auditorium added in 1941.

The original portion of the school features a hipped roof, and the facade can be divided into five sections.  The principal entrance to the building in centered in the original section of the school.   The entrance is located in a shallow projecting gabled three-bay-wide wing.  The doorway is recessed and contains replacement doors.  The doorway, once topped with a transom, is now topped with a panel.  The recessed opening features a beaded-board ceiling and a dentil entablature set above a simple convex frieze.  The frieze rests on simple eared trim with narrow raised panels that wrap the corners.  The doorway is in the center bay, and is bordered by two large twenty-five-over-fifteen replacement windows with simple brick sills.  All three bays are sheltered by a classical portico supported by four tall wooden posts.  The posts feature simple bases and simple moulded trim capitals.  The portico features a simple frieze topped with modillions.  The pediment features more Flemish stretcher bond, an octagonal window and Adamesque garlands.    The portico's concrete floor is reached via full width concrete steps.  A concrete ramp with metal handrail centered on the portico has been added.  

To the north of the entrance portico, the principal section of the building is pierced by three bays.  The center bay contains three windows ganged together.  The center window is a twenty-five-over-fifteen window bordered by two twenty-over-twelve's.  The two remaining bays also contain twenty-over-twelve's.  The northernmost section of the building features a  shallow hipped projecting wing, with the same three-bay configuration of twenty-over-twelve and twenty-five-over-fifteen windows.  The walls of the principal section of the building are laid in Flemish stretcher bond, with one row of alternating headers and stretchers separated by five rows of stretchers. In contrast the elements of the facade that projects from the facade (the gabled entrances, the shallow hipped wings) feature running bond brickwork.  The school building is built over a crawlspace, and the transition from foundation to wall is delineated by a soldier course.  The walls are topped by a wide band.  The shallow soffit is supported by deep moulded trim, now covered with metal.  Metal gutters wrap the building.

The facade to the south of the portico is a mirror of the northern part of the facade, with three bays in the principal section of the building and three bays in a shallow projecting hipped wing. All of the bays containing  twenty-five-over-fifteen and twenty-over-twelve replacement windows.  The 1941 addition meets the original building at the original south elevation.  The addition obscures nearly all of the south elevation of the 1935 building.  The original hipped roof was extended to meet the 1941 addition.  A masonry firewall was extended through the roof between the original building and the addition. A jog in the firewall, may reflect an original recessed entrance on the south elevation.  

Unlike the symmetrical facade the north elevation is asymmetrical, with three bays set near the rear elevation.  Windows are set in the same configuration found on the facade.  The center bay contains three windows ganged together.  The center window is a twenty-five-over-fifteen window bordered by two twenty-over-twelve's.  The two remaining bays also contain twenty-over-twelve's.  The brickwork is running bond.

The rear of the 1935 building has been largely obscured with new construction.  A portion of the original rear elevation is extant adjacent to the north elevation.  A vent and new doorway may have been added.  Two shed-roof dormer vent are set above the rear elevation.  Various modern vents and pipes pierce the roof.  

In 1941, the size of the school was roughly doubled with the addition of classrooms and an auditorium.  The classrooms were added as essentially and extension of the 1935 building projecting from the south elevation.  The original hipped-roof shallow wing afforded the architect a distinct delineation between the old and the new.  The original principal roof was extended to the south to cover the 1941 classrooms, but is interrupted by a  firewall that extends above the roofing and indicates the transition from the 1935 and 1941 construction.   

The classroom addition is very wide, spanning fourteen bays.  From the north, the first seven bays contain alternating single and double twenty-over-twelve replacement windows.  

To the south, the next six bays can be divided into two identical sets of three bays. The center bay in each set contains three windows ganged together.  The center window is a twenty-five-over-fifteen window bordered by two twenty-over-twelve's.  The two remaining bays in each set contains single twenty-five-over-fifteen window.  Like the principal section of the 1935 building, the brickwork of the 1941 addition is laid in Flemish stretcher bond, and features a soldier course at the foundation level, and simple brick window sills.  The wide band found at the top of the wall on the 1935 building is absent on the addition.  The southernmost bay of the 1941 classroom addition is a recessed grade-level recessed entrance.  The recess is formed by a half-round brick arch with cast stone imposts.

The southern end of the 1941 classroom addition terminates at a tall gable-front auditorium.  While the classrooms can be seen as an extension of the form of the 1935 school building, the auditorium adds distinctive new qualities to the building in terms of mass and architectural elements.  The temple-form auditorium is three bays wide.  Nearly full-width masonry steps with brick cheek walls give access to three sets of replacement double doors set in half-round arched openings.  The arches are formed by curved  cast-stone blocks that rise from a full width cast-stone band. The three half-round openings contain three-light transoms, protected by a wrought-iron filigree screens.    Three recessed rectangular stone panels are set in the wall above the arched openings.  Two wall mounted floodlights are set between the panels.  The brick are laid in a  Flemish stretcher bond.  The pediment's entablature features a simple frieze, now covered with metal, and original modillions.  The pediment features modillions and the letter "E" surrounded by circular trim.  The temple-form front of the auditorium is one bay deep and  is smaller in height and width than the principal section of the auditorium.  The south elevation of the front section of the auditorium is pierced by a single fifteen-over-nine window.  The cast-stone band and modillions on the facade are continued on the shallow side elevations.

The front wall of the principal section of the auditorium features a stepped and gabled parapet capped with metal.  The brick are laid in a  Flemish stretcher bond. 

The principal section of the auditorium is five bays deep.  Each bay features a round-arch opening with cast stone imposts and keystone.  Each opening contains a tall twenty-five-over-twenty-five window topped with thirteen-light fanlight sash.  The walls are topped with two rows of corbelled brick.  The soffit is minimal and incorporates a metal gutter.

The auditorium becomes wider near the rear elevation to accommodate a backstage area. This rear section of the south elevation is largely black with the exception of a fire escape exit with metal stairs.  A single original window may have been bricked over.  The rear section of the north elevation of the auditorium is similar, except that the fire escape doorway has also been bricked over.  Just one bay of the north elevation is exposed (the rest is interior space).  The single bay contains a window like that found on the south elevation.

Flat-roofed additions obscure much of the auditorium's rear elevation.  The rear wall features a parapet, and three window openings set high in the gable.

The rear elevation of the 1941 addition is largely intact.  The elevation features the same wall details found on the facade.  It is pierced by three sets of twenty-five-over-fifteen and twenty-over-twelve windows.
A ca. 1949 hipped-roof classroom building is located to the rear of the principal building.  The classroom building faces north , and is set back approximately 40' from Middleton Drive.  The facade is blank with the exception of a pedimented recess doorway containing replacement doors.  The pediment is supported by pilasters topped with moulded trim.  The shallow recess is arched, and sheathed with panels.  The door is topped with an adamesque fanlight.  The brickwork is laid in Flemish stretcher bond. The wall is topped with a wide band covered in metal.  Moulded trim, also covered with metal, supports the shallow soffit, which is wrapped with a roof gutter.

The east elevation is partially obscured by new construction, and a wheelchair ramp.  One set of classroom windows remains exposed. Five windows are set in three bays, with a twenty-five-over-fifteen window bordered by two twenty-over-twelve windows in the center bay, and twenty-five-over-fifteen windows in the other bays.  This same pattern of classroom windows is used on the west side of the building, where three sets of the windows pierce the elevation.  The south elevation is obscured by a classroom building erected in 2001.

A large two-story classroom building was added to the rear of the property in 2001.  While large, the building is not visible from Cherokee Road or Middleton Drive, and does not significantly detract from the historical significance of the property.
Attached to the auditorium by a hyphen is a ca. 1985 brick building.  The building does not significantly detract from the detract from the historical significance of the property.  Below is the hyphen.